Ballot initiatives: Secrets of the most successful progressive strategy in years

Election night 2016 was a nightmare for progressives (and really most Americans), but there was one somewhat surprising and very promising bright spot. Ballot measures pushed by progressive groups were approved by huge margins by voters across the country, resulting in increased minimum wages, expanded Medicaid, and other big policy victories in both blue and red states.

Amazing what happens when the issues are clear and voters are offered a direct chance to improve their lives.

This year, with Republicans dominating government on all level, progressive groups have doubled down on direct democracy to push or fix important policies that corrupt conservatives (and to be fair, many Democrats) have either ignored or openly and cravenly blocked from passing. And as we saw in the massive victory for repealing the toxic “right to work for less” law in Missouri, these are very popular and winnable campaigns.

We’ve covered the red state progressive activists that have gathered enough signatures to get Medicaid expansion on the ballot in Montana, Idaho, and Utah, and there are also a slate of people-powered initiatives that would end gerrymandering in states like Michigan, loosen marijuana laws in Missouri, and fix housing issues in California.  To learn more about the upcoming voter initiatives, Progressives Everywhere spoke with Donna De La Cruz, the communications director for the Ballot Initiative Strategy Center, which helps progressives nationwide launch and strategize direct democracy.

How did a state like Missouri, which is becoming a very red state, vote so overwhelmingly for “right to work” repeal?

For some people just certain issues sort of transcend parties. I think minimum wage is one. With something like the measure in Missouri to repeal the “right to work” law, if it’s messaged right and the public is educated correctly, that makes all the difference.

CLICK HERE to donate to campaigns working hard to pass progressive ballot initiatives!

Why don’t Democrats start campaigning on obviously popular issues? If they see so many people voting to increase the minimum wage, why not champion that, use that language?

Some lawmakers definitely see how powerful ballot measures are. But I think mostly with candidates they don’t really don’t focus on the issues until they see enough polling to see where it’s going to throw their support behind it, which is, which is too bad. They just sort of wait to see how the winds are gonna blow. But I think there are just some initiatives that people just really feel that they want and need. I think the one thing about ballot initiatives is that they’re often not thought of as being partisan.

Definitely right to work was partisan, but things like minimum wage, a lot of people just see it as extra money in their paychecks and not having all the money go to big corporations.

So what does BISC do, as a centralized strategy operation for progressive ballot measures?

We track new track statewide initiatives all year long and we update the list every two weeks. We do a lot of trainings where one of our staffers will go and talk to a group, working them through how the process works. The ballot process works differently in every state.

Sometimes it has to be done through a constitutional amendment. Sometimes you can collect signatures. Sometimes it has to be referred by the legislature. So there are all these different methods and people have to know exactly what the process is. If it’s collecting signatures, they need to know just how many they’re going to need and how many they need from different counties, because you can’t get all the signatures from one area. It’s got to be statewide.

You need to know the cost, like how much manpower do you think you’re going to need? It’s making sure that they are aware that this is not something that can happen quickly in most cases. You have to try to figure out what kind of support you have for it. To see if you can win, but even before you can win, if you can even collect enough signatures to start really campaigning. So there’s a lot of those. We do a lot of those, you know, we do a lot of educational trainings along those lines.

CLICK HERE to donate to campaigns working hard to pass progressive ballot initiatives!

I know that there have been more lawsuits over ballot measures and lawmakers, especially in GOP states, often don’t comply — see Maine and Medicaid — or repeal the measures, right?

Some states are fighting back to keep measures off ballots. North Carolina [Republicans are trying to trick voters into curtailing voting rights] and Michigan’s minimum wage initiative is in court. In Massachusetts, there’s a ballot measure to overturn the state’s anti-discrimination law against transgender people. Even in DC, it’s an example of a pretty heavily Democratic City Council that is trying to overturn a ballot measure that was approved in June during the primary election that would raise the minimum wage for tipped workers. It passed pretty overwhelmingly, but the DC City Council has introduced legislation that would undo it.

Some of these measures are launched by citizens, but there are often big campaigns around them, like in Missouri. What kind of bigger groups have you seen organizing these measures?

There are a couple of climate groups out west that we’re really not a part of, like NextGen. The Restaurant Opportunities group is active in a couple of states to raise the minimum wage. Definitely some unions support paid sick leave and raising the minimum wage as well. It’s a huge variety of groups. There are some really small groups. There’s a group in Florida, we’re really helping them with restoring the right to vote for former felons. That’s Second Chances Florida. They were formed solely to get this amendment on the ballot and then get it passed in Florida.

What kind of legwork does it take to get something on the ballot? How long does it usually take?

I’ll just give you an example. In Washington state, there’s an initiative on the ballot to tax polluters who emit fossil fuels and then they would use that money for clean jobs. That has been discussed for at least at least a couple of years before they even tried to put it on the ballot. I know that it was still being discussed like two years ago, just trying to generate the support and trying to figure out the educational campaign for that. Because that’s a tough one because the average citizen probably never even thinks about a carbon tax.

And I know that with the Florida initiative, you take some polls just to see like what the sentiment is among the residents, whether or not people do agree that ex-felons should be given the right to vote. So it’s a lot of education and just research first.

CLICK HERE to donate to campaigns working hard to pass progressive ballot initiatives!

Florida has a fully Republican state government. Let’s say Democrats flip a lot of legislatures and governorships this year and win power in a lot more states. How do you see ballot measures playing a role in an environment that’s more friendly to the issues they are working to pass?

I would definitely hope that it would be seen as a good leverage tool for citizens. The teachers in Arizona that went on strike earlier this year to get a raise in pay have really banded together to get an education measure on the ballot that would tax the wealthiest people in Arizona and use that money to pay for education. I know that banding together to raise their own pay gave them this idea. But it has not been popular at all. It just survived a legal challenge this week.

So getting all those signatures to get on the ballot definitely doesn’t always mean it’s super-popular or is going to pass.

I think sometimes just because it’s on the ballot, there’s a lot of education that needs to be done. There’s a measure on the Ohio ballot that would affect nonviolent drug offenders and I think that they barely got the number of signatures that they needed to get to get on the ballot. So I think that there’s still a lot of work there.

And people think that ballot measures are just really poorly worded, which they are, and the groups don’t write the ballot language. It’s the secretary of state’s offices and sometimes lawmakers start chiming in. So sometimes it makes no sense, so even if it’s really popular and on the ballot, it can be confusing to people and it’s always the last item on a ballot. So people might have supported it had they known it or if it had a different title or was just easier to read.

CLICK HERE to donate to campaigns working hard to pass progressive ballot initiatives!

What are the kinds of ballot measures you’re seeing the most this year?

Over the last year or two, the minimum wage has still been up there, but this year, we’re seeing a lot of gerrymandering initiatives. In most instances, redistricting is only done every 10 years, so it’s really interesting to see the number of gerrymandering initiatives on there to take the power away from partisan groups and give them to an independent commission. I think that’s a really interesting one to watch.

There’s not as much paid sick leave on the ballot statewide as I think people would have hoped. And I think some people are surprised that there’s not very many gun control measures on the ballot, especially given the shooting at the high school in Florida. Our take is that it was just too quick, there wasn’t enough time for people for people to get the measures on the ballot this year.

People have been really pressuring legislators on guns — maybe they don’t realize that ballot measures can be used for even that issue.

I think more people are definitely seeing the usefulness of ballot measures. I just think sometimes it’s a daunting task, especially if we want to do it statewide. But I think it’s all about educating people and getting the word out.

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Diving deep into Obama’s endorsements

First, a big push in Ohio: Tuesday marks the final big special election before the midterms. OH-12 is another GOP district that Democrats are close to turning blue thanks to a bright young candidate and voters’ disgust with Trump’s sloppy, treasonous, batshit-insane presidency. Danny O’Connor is running a great campaign and the polls are within the margin of error. Trump even left his padded TV den to visit Ohio this weekend, so you know he’s scared of losing. Donate to Democrat Danny O’Connor here!

Now, the big news: Last week, former President Barack Obama released his first round of endorsements for local and statewide candidates. I’m not saying he’s definitely a Progressives Everywhere subscriber, but he diiid have a number of the candidates that we’ve supported on his list — including Deidre DeJear, the Democratic nominee for Iowa Secretary of State, who I just so happened to feature in last week’s edition.

OK, so Barack Obama probably isn’t reading this newsletter. But his endorsements were a very welcomed development. The former president himself admits that state and local parties withered during his time in office. Now, he’s actively working to help a bunch of Democratic candidates — but who are they? And which of them are most worth supporting with your money?

First, here are the crossover candidates who have gotten both the Progressives Everywhere and Obama bumps: DeJear (IA-SoS) (Donate Here), Stacey Abrams (GA-Gov) (Donate Here), Kathleen Clyde (OH-SoS) (Donate Here), Richard Cordray (OH-Gov) (Donate Here), Lauren Underwood (IL-14) (Donate Here), and Tina Davis (PA-State Senate) (Donate Here).

All of Obama’s state legislature choices are in legislative chambers that are either up for grabs or under a breakable GOP supermajority. There are some great congressional candidates too, but this time around, I’m going to focus on very competitive state capitol races, where donations go the furthest.

Here are the first five candidates that especially excite me, in races that could make the biggest impact.

Tammy Story (CO-SD-16): There are two reasons to support Tammy Story’s campaign for State Senate in Colorado. First, she’s an active and accomplished public school advocate who helped lead the successful recall of three conservatives who had hijacked the Jefferson County Board of Education and went to war against teachers and students. She’s also a dedicated environmentalist and devoted to ensuring equal pay for equal work.

Second, she’s running against the embodiment of the modern Republican: Tim Neville is a noxious, far-right, mean-spirited nihilist who regularly sponsors bills that would strip rights and protections from LGBTQ Coloradans and make automatic weapons even more accessible. In 2016, to promote a bill that would allow concealed carry without a permit, an insane idea already, he went and held an AR-15 giveaway. The guy is a lunatic. That the GOP holds the Colorado state senate by one seat would make ousting this psycho even sweeter.

CLICK HERE to donate to Tammy Story and all our choices via Progressives Everywhere’s ActBlue page for Obama’s Picks

Faith Winter (CO-SD-24): Few public officials have the guts that Faith Winter displayed last year. As the #MeToo movement began to rattle entrenched power in Hollywood and Washington, Winter, a member of the Colorado House of Representatives, stood up for herself and nearly a dozen other women who were sexually harassed by State Rep. Steve Lebsock. First, she spoke out in public, then called his bluff by filing a formal complaint. That Lebsock was also a Democrat made it an even braver choice, as political parties so often try to brush their members’ sins under the rug. It was a very messy fight and Lebsock did not go quietly — he basically went nuts — but he was ultimately expelled from the legislature. The fight goes on and Winter is helping to lead the way.

She should not be defined only by her fight against sexual harassment, because Winter has a slew of other accomplishments. She helped train women to run for office through the Emerge America program, introduced Equal Pay and Paid Family Leave laws (which went down in the State Senate), advocates for affordable housing, and fights for public education.

CLICK HERE to donate to Faith Winter and all our choices via Progressives Everywhere’s ActBlue page for Obama’s Picks
Laura Fortman (ME-SD-13): When it comes down to actually passing legislation and influencing government, Frances Perkins will forever rank as one of the most important figures in the history of the progressive movement. As FDR’s Secretary of Labor, she helped rally workers and labor unions and enacted much of the New Deal’s most important policies, operating in FDR’s long shadow. So when a politician lists Perkins as a hero, you immediately take notice.

Laura Fortman has spent her career fighting for workers and women, as the head of the Maine Women’s Lobby and the Maine Department of Labor, then later for the US Department of Labor. She also served as the head of the Frances Perkins’ Center, a museum dedicated to Perkins’ legacy. Her understanding of the complicated web of issues facing the working class makes her an ideal candidate for a state that just suffered through Gov. Paul LePage, a grumpy old bigot who would rather go to jail than expand access to healthcare.

CLICK HERE to donate to Laura Fortman and her Maine Democratic colleagues, plus all our other choices via Progressives Everywhere’s ActBlue page for Obama’s Picks

Erica Crowley (OH-HD-26): I’ve read a lot of personal statements from candidates over the years, and generally speaking, they are rote and filled with focus-group-tested buzzwords. Not Erica Crowley’s. Her life story is incredible, from a childhood raised by drug addicts (who have since recovered) to a decorated career in the military, a law degree, and a career helping non-profits serving her community’s most vulnerable people.

She is the kind of person who should be running our government at all levels. Smart, accomplished, and empathetic, with both ideals and actionable ideas informed by lived experience. This, from her website, says it all: “I refuse to idly stand by while income inequality, access to affordable and quality healthcare, and the fight for equitable education continue to be growing issues.”

CLICK HERE to donate to Erica Crowley and all our choices via Progressives Everywhere’s ActBlue page for Obama’s Picks

Taylor Sappington (OH-HD-94): Speaking of policy informed by experience, Taylor Sappington‘s story is also one of dire circumstances in childhood leading to empathy and vision in adulthood. Growing up in southeastern Ohio, Sappington grew up in a union family that hit rock bottom when her mom’s employer downsized. Bills went unpaid and they lost just about everything, including electricity and even their car, a key to life in rural Ohio.

Thanks to public education and then a lot of student loans, Sappington graduated college and wound up on the local city council. His platform calls for better funding for public education, increased access to healthcare, better rural infrastructure, clean elections, and renewable energy. He is the sort of candidate that could turn the tide for Democrats in rural areas that have become reflexively Republican, a local boy who understands the region and can help it navigate the changing economy.

CLICK HERE to donate to Taylor Sappington and all our choices via Progressives Everywhere’s ActBlue page for Obama’s Picks

Electoral news roundup: The future is female in Texas

Trump and Putin’s press conference yesterday was nothing short of pathetic. It deserves all the outrage we can throw at it — but it’s also not the only pressing news story happening right now. Here’s a look at some of the most important electoral stories happening right now:

  • In Texas, women are running for office in unprecedented numbers. Right now, there are only 29 women in the 150-seat State Legislature and eight women out of 31 state senators. But women make up nearly half of the Democratic Party’s nominees this year — including its nominee for governor.
  • Defying conventional wisdom, bold progressivism — and democratic socialism — is on the rise in western Pennsylvania and the suburbs of Pittsburgh. Lt. Governor candidate John Fetterman, the ultra-popular mayor of Braddock, is helping the surge. Bernie Sanders recently visited Pittsburgh to rally with Fetterman.
  • Maine voters overwhelmingly approved a ballot measure to expand Medicaid last fall, but the state’s insane GOP governor, Paul LePage, refuses to carry out the will of the people. He’s now defying a court order to implement the Medicaid expansion, and just last week said he’d sooner go to jail than help working people go to the doctor. We’d like to see both happen.
  • Activists in Michigan delivered over 400,000 signatures to get a voter rights initiative on the ballot this fall. But a group of corporations is now suing to have the initiative removed from the ballot, a scary prospect given the fact that the State Supreme Court is made up entirely of Republicans. Citizens are fighting back, though, holding protests in Detroit to demand that the Chamber of Commerce, one of the lawsuits’ financiers, pulls out of the effort to thwart democracy.
  • The Koch Brothers are behind some incredibly misleading mailers to voters in Missouri, where Right to Work is on the ballot. Of course, they’re yet another attack on unions and workers.
  • New Hampshire is making it harder for people to vote, especially college students.