Special elections down south could make a huge difference

You thought there would be time to rest after Election Day? C’mon. There are some big special elections coming down the pike already!

In Virginia, Democrats could take the State House of Delegates and win a state government trifecta if they can pull off an upset in the special election for HD-24. It’s a historically very red seat, but remember that Democrats flipped a ton of red seats in the Virginia legislature in 2017 and won big in congressional elections there this year, so the party is motivated and firing on all cylinders.

The Democratic nominee, chosen yesterday, is Christian Worth. The Republican nomination is a bit cloudy right now, as two candidates are separated by a single vote and there’s been no concession. Perhaps Democrats can take advantage of the division and grab the seat. The election is December 18th.

There’s also a special election in the State Senate, for the seat being vacated by Congresswoman-elect Jennifer Wexton. SD-33 definitely leans blue, but given the close divide in the Virginia legislature, it’s important to help Democratic Del. Jennifer Boysko, who won the nomination yesterday. The election is on January 8th.

I know it can be hard to fully care about these local elections, especially after such a draining national election cycle. But they really do make a direct difference in the lives of tens of millions of people, which then goes on to impact national politics, as we’ve learned these last few years. This story on all the progressive initiatives being put forth in states where Democrats took back power gives a nice peek at what the candidates we helped will be doing this year.

Right away, we’re likely to see some gun control in Nevada, worker protections in Wisconsin, environmental regulations in Colorado, and Medicaid expansion in a number of states. New York has a more progressive legislature that is fighting hard against the Amazon swindle (or at least make politicians pay the price for it). New Jersey is going to raise its minimum wage (we’re coming for you, Sweeney). In Illinois, Nevada, and New Mexico, Democrats have full control over redistricting. These races all really matter (especially if we keep the pressure on after Democrats take power).

CLICK HERE to donate to Democrats running in special elections via Progressives Everywhere’s ActBlue page!

The two most high-profile races are taking place down south, in Mississippi and Georgia. These are new battleground states, with far more than the individual election outcomes at stake.

In Mississippi, a special election for the state’s second US Senate seat pits Mike Espy, a former Congressman and Secretary of Agriculture, against Cindy Hyde-Smith, a mean-spirited and unrepentant racist who was appointed to the position earlier this year.

With the focus squarely on this race, Hyde-Smith’s nastiness has been on full display. She enthusiastically endorsed public hangings and “joked” that voter suppression was a good thing. She says that those comments were jokes; local media says otherwise.

But debates over just how serious she was about these particular comments are almost irrelevant; the fact is that Hyde-Smith is an automatic vote for Trump — she’s sided with him a whopping 100% of the time, and that says it all.

With Republicans defending 20 seats in the 2020 election, there are likely to be some Republicans trying to distance themselves from Trump and the national party (hey, Susan Collins is up for re-election). Even if Democrats don’t have the majority this time around, one seat could be crucial to blocking judges and other confirmations in the Senate. And of course, winning this race will bring us one step closer to a majority next time around.

Mississippi is also a state that, despite its deep south heritage, should not be a lock for Republicans. Its population is 40% African-American, and as we saw in Alabama last year, when black voters are motivated — and more importantly, treated properly and valued by national Democrats — they can make all the difference in a statewide race. Progressives Everywhere is devoted to empowering Democratic grassroots voters everywhere, which makes this Mississippi race a perfect focus for our efforts.

CLICK HERE to donate to Democrats running in special elections via Progressives Everywhere’s ActBlue page!

The Mississippi race may depend on overcoming voter suppression, which has been a common theme this election cycle. It was especially prominent in Georgia, where Stacey Abrams just ended her campaign for governor. It will go down as a bitter election loss but perhaps, in the end, a crucial victory for free and fair elections. Abrams’ fight for every vote exposed the true breadth of the damage done to the state’s democracy by her opponent, former Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp.

We knew about the 1.6 million voters he erased from the system over his two terms, the largest such purge in American history. We knew about the ridiculous lawsuit he filed days before the election. We knew about the over 50,000 people he wanted to ban from voting with trapdoor inanities. And on Election Day, we saw how he abused voters by throttling the number of voting machines in largely minority districts. Then came revelations of the absentee ballots sent out late by his office and his efforts to throw out provisional ballots, followed by Kemp’s continued public legal battles against counting votes.

Democracy is on a respirator in Georgia and just about everything has to change if we’re going to bring it back to life ahead of the 2020 election. That starts with replacing Brian Kemp as Secretary of State with Democrat John Barrow, who will compete in a runoff election for the position on December 4th.

Barrow, a former Congressman from 2005-2015, was initially bumped from office due to the last administration’s gross gerrymandering of Georgia, so he knows full well just how much power the state government can wield. His platform is a stark contrast to that of his GOP opponent, Brad Raffensperger, who wants to keep on purging voters and forcing others to conform to strict ID laws that make it so tough to cast a ballot (and even tougher to have it actually count). Barrow would make it easier to vote; Raffensperger wants to disenfranchise everyone he can.

“It shouldn’t be easier to get kicked off the rolls if you’re a registered voter, a citizen entitled to vote, than it is to have your water turned off,” Barrow told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution late last month. “It’s just as bad to kick somebody off the rolls who has a right to participate and has done nothing wrong as it is to let somebody in who has no business voting.”

Georgia is in the middle of a massive population shift, making it more likely to vote in Democrats than ever before — it already provided several big upsets in this year’s Congressional elections. But that can’t happen if citizens aren’t allowed to vote. Even without the partisanship angle, an assault on democracy is an assault on us all, and Georgia has a chance to stand up to anti-voting goons next month. Let’s help them out and stand with them as they fight for their future — and ours.

CLICK HERE to donate to Democrats running in special elections via Progressives Everywhere’s ActBlue page!

 

As Stacey Abrams fights for every vote, Democrat John Barrow fights to replace Brian Kemp and save democracy

Stacey Abrams’ tireless post-Election Day campaign to get every possible vote in Georgia counted isn’t just about trying to win the governorship today. Her fight is also exposing the true breadth of the damage done to the state’s democracy by her opponent, former Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp.

We knew about the 1.6 million voters he erased from the system over his two terms, the largest such purge in American history. We knew about the ridiculous lawsuit he filed days before the election. We knew about the over 50,000 people he wanted to ban from voting with trapdoor inanities. And on Election Day, we saw how he abused voters by throttling the number of voting machines in largely minority districts. Now comes word about the absentee ballots sent out late by his office, his efforts to throw out provisional ballots, and Kemp’s continued legal battles against counting votes.

No matter what happens in this election, we’re seeing that democracy is on a respirator in Georgia and that a whole lot has to change if we’re going to bring it back to life. That starts with replacing Brian Kemp as Secretary of State with Democrat John Barrow, who will compete in a runoff election for the position on December 4th.

Barrow, a former Congressman from 2005-2015, was initially bumped from office due to the last administration’s gross gerrymandering of Georgia, so he knows full well just how much power the state government can wield. His platform is a stark contrast to that of his GOP opponent, Brad Raffensperger, who wants to keep on purging voters and forcing others to conform to strict ID laws that make it so tough to cast a ballot (and even tougher to have it actually count). Barrow would make it easier to vote; Raffensperger wants to disenfranchise everyone he can.

“It shouldn’t be easier to get kicked off the rolls if you’re a registered voter, a citizen entitled to vote, than it is to have your water turned off,” Barrow told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution late last month. “It’s just as bad to kick somebody off the rolls who has a right to participate and has done nothing wrong as it is to let somebody in who has no business voting.”

Georgia is in the middle of a massive population shift, making it more likely to vote in Democrats than ever before — it already provided several big upsets in this year’s Congressional elections. But that can’t happen if citizens aren’t allowed to vote. Even without the partisanship angle, an assault on democracy is an assault on us all, and Georgia has a chance to stand up to anti-voting goons next month. Let’s help them out and stand with them as they fight for their future — and ours.

CLICK HERE to donate to John Barrow’s campaign via his Progressives Everywhere ActBlue page!

For more stories like this one about local progressive campaigns, subscribe to the free weekly Progressives Everywhere newsletter.

Why Beto didn’t really lose: Texas Democrats made huge gains, ousting the worst Republicans

Democrats will likely end with 38 House pickups and new senators from Arizona and Nevada. On the state level, we flipped seven governorships (with Georgia and Florida still up in the air) and six state legislative chambers (including the State Senate here in New York!), with nearly 400 legislative seats flipped over the course of this election cycle. Democrats in Arizona narrowed Republican majorities, while Team Blue broke super-majorities in crucial states like Pennsylvania and North Carolina. A majority of voters actually voted Democrat in NC; an absurd GOP gerrymander was the only thing that kept that party in power.

There was also an immense amount of progress made in Texas. Really.

On paper, rockstar Rep. Beto O’Rourke came just short of unseating Sen. Ted Cruz, who beat him by less than three percentage points. It comes as little consolation to many of O’Rourke’s national supporters that it was the closest race in Texas in years — we all desperately wanted to unseat Cruz, a cynical snake wearing a suit of second-hand human skin with a face only an exterminator could love. But even though Beto came up short, his all-inclusive grassroots campaign helped lift other Democrats across Texas, assisting in major gains in a number of areas.

Texas map
via Washington Post

First and foremost, Democrats flipped two House seats (TX-7 and TX-32) and came within 1000 votes of flipping another (TX-23). They cut into noxious Lt. Gov Dan Patrick’s margin of victory, taking him from a 19-point win in 2014 to just a five-point win over (Progressives Everywhere-supported) Mike Collier this time around. The Attorney General race was even closer, settled by just over three points.

In the state legislature, Dems flipped a dozen House seats and took two State Senate seats — the two seats that Progressives Everywhere raised money to contest, so congratulations to newly minted State Sen. Beverly Powell (SD-10) and Nathan Johnson (SD-16)! We’re excited to see Goku toys popping up around the capitol in Austin.

Democrats also flipped four major appeals courts in Austin, Houston and Dallas, giving them a majority on half the state’s intermediate — and most active — courts. And in Austin, activists passed a $250 million affordable housing bond measure that will help working people continue to live in the city, which has seen a surge in real estate and housing prices thanks to a boom in transplants and tech companies, among other things.

To get a more granular look at individual races, I reached out to Joe Deshotel, an activist who hosts the podcast “Left in Texas.” There was one Democratic win in particular, he said, that should have an outsized positive impact on future elections.

“The biggest hidden gem of the 2018 midterm has to be the defeat of Harris County Clerk Stan Stanart,” Deshotel told me. “It’s hard to know if he was truly corrupt, totally incompetent or both, but he had been the GOP’s biggest firewall in the state’s largest county. In fact, 25% of votes in the Texas GOP primary come from Harris County. He was also the state’s biggest obstacle preventing online voter registration which will be a focus in the upcoming session as far as election issues are concerned.”

As the Houston Chronicle reported in August, a few Republicans have stood in the way of bipartisan efforts to bring online voter registration to the state, which would help boost its legacy of terrible turnout. A federal judge even found the state in violation of the 1993 Motor Voter law because Texas allows people to renew their driver’s licenses online but not register to vote. “With Stanart out of the way,” Deshotel added, “expect more votes for statewide candidates and a continued bluing of Harris County, which was previously purple.”

Deshotel suggests that Texas is now more competitive than Ohio, a remarkable assertion that, given the sheer number of seats in Congress and in the state legislature, actually checks out. While Ohio — thanks in part to gross gerrymanders — resisted the very real Blue Wave, plenty of seats in Texas got caught in the rising tide.

Given the changes to the state, the energy on display this cycle, and the substantial infrastructure built by motivated young volunteers, the hope is that this is no one-time fluke.

For more stories like this one about local progressive campaigns, subscribe to the free weekly Progressives Everywhere newsletter.

The biggest wins for progressive Democrats on Election Day

The headline here is obvious: Democrats took back the House of Representatives, overwhelming Republicans in suburban districts and introducing a vital check — and hopefully a motherlode of investigations — on the Trump administration.

Take a moment to breathe, smile, and take a sip of coffee (or something else, no judgment here, it was a long night).

The Blue Wave was powered by victories by so many of the candidates that Progressives Everywhere readers supported on a variety of fundraising lists. The list of candidates and their results, which I’m still updating, can be found HERE.

I’m specifically excited by victories by early endorsees Lauren Underwood (IL-14), Abby Finkenauer (IA-01), and Cindy Axne (IA-03); history-making victories by candidates such as Sharice Davids (KS-03), an openly gay former MMA fighter who became the first Native American woman in Congress; and New Jersey endorsees Mikie Sherrill (NJ-11) and Tom Malinowski (NJ-07), who ran in the district where I graduated high school. I’m also excited to see Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (NY-14), who we endorsed and interviewed when no one thought she’d win, finally take her seat in Congress.

Ballot initiatives

It was a great night for progressive policy in direct democracy!

True populist economic policy won big on Tuesday. Medicaid expansion passed in Idaho, Nebraska, and Utah, while Missouri and Arkansas overwhelmingly passed an increase in the state minimum wage.

Voting rights also got a huge boost. Michigan and Missouri passed initiatives to create fairer, non-partisan redistricting. Michigan also passed same-day and automatic voter registration. Nevada passed automatic voter registration. And Florida made the groundbreaking decision to return the right to vote to 1.5 million former felons who fully finished their sentences.

Oh, and Missouri legalized medical marijuana, while Michigan just straight up legalized it for recreational use.

What we learned tonight is that progressive legislation is popular. Medicaid expansion, minimum wage increases, legalizing marijuana, redistricting reform passed in very red states and it wasn’t even close. So going forward, the goal has to be branding Democrats as the party of those ideas, to cut through the racist fear that the GOP spews to stoke tribalism and force people to vote against their own interest.

State legislatures

Democrats flipped seven chambers and took back over 300 seats this cycle — making up about a third of the ground we lost during the Obama years. It’s a good start!

New York made history by turning blue — really. After nearly a century of being controlled by Republicans, the State Senate is now in Democratic hands. The real fight for the chamber came earlier this fall, when brave progressive candidates took on the cynical turncoat members of the IDC, a group of former Democrats who colluded with the GOP. They finished the job on Tuesday, giving Democrats full control of the state government. I’m proud that Progressives Everywhere helped raise a lot of money for these bold progressive real Democratic candidates!

New York now has the potential to be a leader in progressive policy, but it’ll take ongoing pressure on newly re-elected Andrew Cuomo to make it happen. Perhaps his presidential aspirations will make him more likely to work with his own party towards producing real results. I can promise you that local organizations like the Working Families Party, which worked so hard to win back the State Senate, won’t let him get away with talking a big game but stymying legislation.

Democrats also won a trifecta in Colorado, where Progressives Everywhere-endorsed State Senate candidates Faith Winter and Tammy Story both came out on top. Maine Democrats flipped the State Senate, as well, which we pushed to make happen.

Small progress was made in North Carolina, where we broke the GOP’s super-majorities in both houses of the legislature, which was a crucial step toward stopping the Republicans from absolutely obliterating democracy in the state. They also broke a State Senate supermajority in Michigan. Meanwhile, they won their own supermajorities in both houses of the Oregon legislature.

Governorships

Kansas did the right thing and handed slick huckster Kris Kobach a resounding defeat, electing Democrat Laura Kelly governor. A loss here would have been incredibly dispiriting and I’m very excited that Kansans saw through this Kobach and banished him after years of his embarrassing the state.

Equally monumental and soul-affirming was Wisconsin’s ultimate rejection of Governor Scott Walker. He tried to break the spirit of that proud progressive bastion by hammering labor unions and throttling voting rights, but the people there rose up to defeat him in a close race, handing the government to the infinitely more compassionate Supervisor of Schools, Tony Evers.

Democrats also took over the Governor’s mansion in Maine, where Janet Mills takes over for the hateful windbag Paul LePage. Medicaid will finally be expanded in the state, well over a year after voters overwhelmingly approved it.

It was a great night for Democrats in Michigan, including newly minted Governor-elect Gretchen Whitmer. She survived a tough primary and romped in the general election against the truly odious Bill Schuette.

Nevada elected a Democratic governor as well as flipping its Senate seat from red to blue, moving the state one step closer to being a safe member of the Democratic coalition.

It was a disappointing night in Florida, Ohio, and Iowa, where Democrats lost close races — excruciatingly close in the case of Florida. I’ll never give up on any state, but there are a lot of questions to be answered about how Ron DeSantis, a proud and vile racist, won after running such a terrible campaign.

As for Georgia, it was always going to be tough to beat Brian Kemp, who spent eight years disenfranchising voters to set up his eventual victory. Stacey Abrams put up an epic fight and this is not the last we will hear from her after such a close race in Georgia.

Every single candidate that I spotlighted with an interview was running an underdog campaign, the sort of race that Democrats in the past wouldn’t have even bothered to contest. I chose these candidates because they were inspirational progressives willing to fight for their principles in the face of long odds and corporate-funded Republican opponents in deep red districts. And while they largely fell short in their races, they uniformly outperformed Democrats from past cycles, paving the way for future successes.

I named this newsletter Progressives Everywhere because I believe that to truly build a national majority and a better America, we need to build a bold Democratic Party in every single district in the nation. That is not an overnight (or single campaign cycle) proposition. It takes endless devotion and dedication to doing the sort of grassroots work that is its own reward when nobody’s writing magazine profiles or sending campaign checks.

So many of our Progressives Everywhere were chosen because they put in that kind of work. Jess King (PA-11) helped build an entire movement and won nearly 43% in a rural Pennsylvania district that got more red during the Supreme Court’s redistricting. J.D. Scholten toured around his rural Iowa district in a Winnebago for over a year and gave Nazi Steve King the race of his life. Julie Oliver (TX-25) ran in an unbelievably gerrymandered Texas district and won 45% of the vote. These were all first-time candidates who have bright futures as leaders of a new Democratic Party.

So, what’s next?

Well, we continue to work. In states where Democrats took over the levers of government, we pressure them to pass progressive legislation that materially helps people. Where we fell short, we put pressure on Republicans and fight back against regressive policy. And we continue to organize and build grassroots energy and infrastructure to further our gains and restore fairness to a still deeply unbalanced country.

If you are working on one of those campaigns, volunteer for one of those groups, are acquainted with a potential political candidate, or just care about an issue you want to see addressed, please reach out to me at ProgressivesEverywhere@gmail.com!

Races for progressives to watch on Election Day

Here we are, two days out from the most important election of our lifetimes, which is a statement that is eminently dramatic but somehow undersells the gravity of what we are facing. I truly don’t know what American democracy will look like if Democrats don’t sweep up at the ballot box on Tuesday. And it’s not just because of the threat posed by Trump and his sycophantic posse. All across the country, there are pitched battles being fought over issues that directly touch the lives of tens of millions of people — and will, more broadly, impact us all.

Here is a guide to the biggest issues and races to watch on what will be a very nerve-wracking, exciting Tuesday evening.

Candidates we’ve interviewed

Over the last seven months, I spoke with candidates up and down the ballot. I focused on candidates who were running crucial races on the state level and true progressives running underdog campaigns against some of the worst Republicans (and a few bad Democrats!) on the national level.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (NY-14)
Jess King (PA-11)
Julie Oliver (TX-25)
Alessandra Biaggi (NY-SD-34)
J.D. Scholten (IA-04)
Cyndi Ralston (OK-HD-12)
Zach Dickerson (OH-HD-42)
Deidre DeJear (IA-Sec State)
Kriss Marion (WI-SD-17)
Janet Garrett (OH-04)
Miguel Levario (TX-19)

Voting Rights

As we’ve seen this fall, Republicans hate democracy and are continuing to do everything they can to make it impossible to vote. The sheer number of states that have surpassed their 2014 early voting numbers is heartening, but the overall numbers would be way higher without so much disenfranchisement.

After Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp purged over a million voters from the rolls without much national attention, his late flourishes of injustice finally provoked notice and outrage. Some of his ploys were overturned by courts, providing very limited relief to a small number of the disenfranchised, but the man is persistent in his quest to steal the governorship from former State House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams, who has worked tirelessly to expand voting rights. Just today, Kemp’s office launched an erroneous investigation into Democratic groups.

The same thing is playing out in so many states. In Ohio, the purge of nearly 1.5 million voters was sanctioned by the right-wing Supreme Court. The nation’s leader in racist, anti-democratic quackery, Kris Kobach, is running for governor in Kansas. Iowa’s Republican leadership, if re-elected, has promised to finish installing strict voter ID. We spoke to Iowa’s Democratic candidate for Secretary of State, Deidre DeJear, about her very different approach — she wants to expand the electorate — earlier this fall.

There are a number of important Secretary of State races to watch on Tuesday: GeorgiaIowaOhioColoradoArizonaNevada, and Michigan (where voting rights expansion is also on the ballot, via Proposal 3). You can donate to the candidates in each of those races HERE. To help fight against Kemp and Kobach ascending to the governor’s mansions in their respective states, you can donate to Stacey Abrams in Georgia and Laura Kelly in Kansas.

In Florida, a whopping 1.5 million permanently disenfranchised people could get their right to vote back if Amendment 4 passes with 60%. In Nevada, approving Question 5 on the ballot will institute automatic voter registration.

In Ohio, it will be far easier to restore voting rights (and fix so many other issues) if Democrat Richard Cordray wins the neck-and-neck race for governor. His opponent is a right-wing creep, Mike DeWine, and he’s both for voter purges and throttling Medicaid.

Healthcare

The messy state of the American healthcare system has been neck-and-neck with Trump’s psychotic behavior as the most important issue in this election. And while we can’t force Trump to undergo a brain scan or hypnosis, we can fight to protect and expand access to healthcare.

After spending eight years trying to repeal Obamacare (an effort that is still ongoing) and undermining it at every turn, Republicans are sinking to new degrees of shamelessness to suggest they are in favor of protecting pre-existing conditions. We know that’s a lie and hope voters know it, too. First and foremost, you can give to Democrats running in toss-up races for Congress. If we win the House back, Obamacare is going nowhere.

Then, watch the races in a number of states where Medicaid has been limited by new and very onerous work requirements. In Wisconsin, the Trump Administration just approved new work requirements, so the gubernatorial and State Senate races are crucial; you can read our interview with one of the most important State Senate candidates and then donate to the Democratic candidate for governor, Tony Evers, and several State Senate candidates right HERE.

Michigan also just passed work requirements on Medicaid, making the gubernatorial and State House races there crucial to undoing the cruel limitation. You can help out the candidates right HERE.

Meanwhile, in Maine, voters overwhelmingly chose to expand Medicaid in the last election, but their gassy hate toad of a governor, Paul LePage, just outright (and illegally) refused to follow through. He’s term-limited and leaving office, so both the race to replace him, which is neck-and-neck, as well as to flip the State Senate, which is entirely up in the air, are absolutely crucial. You can donate to that effort right HERE.

And in several red states, voters will be deciding via ballot initiative to expand Medicaid. Despite ginned up fears about socialism and consistent support for Republicans, it looks like it will pass in UtahMontana, and Idaho, and be permanently enshrined in Nebraska.

There are a whole lot of other ballot measures, as well, including ones focused on legalizing marijuana, fixing gross gerrymandering, and raising the minimum wage. You can follow them via Daily Kos’s handy guide.

Flipping Legislatures and Fixing Education

Democrats have finally started to pay attention to state legislature races, awakened to their importance by the sheer number of Republican majorities that have installed heinous gerrymanders, limited voting rights, deserted working people, and let schools crumble. In a lot of the hottest state races that we’ve explored, teachers are running as Democrats to help restore funding and sanity to public schools that have been gouged by tax cuts and for-profit charter schools.

But winning majorities in most states won’t happen in one election, especially because Republicans are still spending more in state legislature races than Democrats. That said, we’re watching races that could either flip chambers or at least break super-majorities in a number of states. Here are the specific candidates for whom we’ve raised money and endorsed and are still in competitive elections (in New York, the primary was in many cases the real election):

Kentucky: Jeanie Smith (KY-SD-32), Tina Bojanowski (KY-HD-32)

Colorado: Faith Winter (CO-SD-24), Tammy Story (CO-SD-16)

Ohio: Erica Crawley (OH-HD-26), Lauren Friedman (OH-SD-29), Taylor Sappington (OH-HD-94), Lorraine Wilburn (OH-HD-48), Rachel Crooks (OH-HD-88)

Iowa: Jackie Smith (IA-SD-07), Lindsay James (IA-HD-99)

Oklahoma: Jacob Rosecrants (OK-HD-46), Angela Graham (OK-HD-66), Cyndi Ralston (OK-HD-12), Josh Martin (OK-HD-70)

New York: Anna Kaplan (NY-SD-4), Jessica Ramos (NY-SD-13), John Mannion (NY-SD-50), Monica Martinez (NY-SD-3), Rachel May (NY-SD-53), Robert Jackson (NY-SD-31)

Texas: Beverly Powell (TX-SD-10), Nathan Johnson (TX-SD-16)

Wisconsin: Kriss Marion (WI-SD-17), Julie Henszey (WI-SD-05), Lee Snodgrass (WI-SD-19)

Maine: All Democratic State Senate candidates fundraise online together.

Swing Congressional Candidates

Through a variety of ActBlue pages and initiatives, Progressives Everywhere raised tens of thousands of dollars for candidates in toss-up Congressional races. Here’s the list of candidates, along with Andrew Janz (CA-22).

Abby Finkenauer* (IA-01)
DD Adams* (NC-05)
Lauren Underwood* (IL-14)
Mikie Sherrill* (NJ-11)
Clarke Tucker* (AR-02)
Kathleen Williams (MT-AL)
Cindy Axne* (IA-03)
Hiral Tipirneni* (AZ-08)
Rick Neal* (OH-15)
Karen McCormack* (CO-04)
Amy McGrath (KY-06)
Abigail Spanberger (VA-07)
Andy Kim (NJ-03)
Antonio Delgado (NY-19)
Anthony Brindisi (NY-22)
Angie Craig (MN-02)
Gil Cisneros (CA-39)
Katie Hill (CA-25)
Katie Porter (CA-45)
Tom Malinowski (NJ-07)
Lizzie Fletcher (TX07)
Sharice Davids (KS-03)
Sean Casten (IL-06)
Harley Rouda (CA-48)
Jason Crow (CO-06)
Jared Golden (ME-02)
Dean Phillips (MN-03)